How one man makes a difference in Afghanistan

PARWAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Ghouse Loynab, human terrain analyst with Human Terrain Team, TF Red Bulls, takes notes as he talks to a villager about governance and development issues Feb. (click for more)

Guardians of Peace produces results in Paktya

PAKTYA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Clint Koerperich of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, squad leader for 2nd Platoon, Company C., 1st Battalion, 168th Infantry Regiment, patrols with ANA soldiers (click for more)

Working together to put Afghan heroes back together again

PAKTYA, Afghanistan – Gheiratullah, an Afghan medical soldier, practices self aid and buddy care at the Paktya Regional Medical Center Feb. 13. (click for more)

Bidder’s conference places Afghans in control

PAKTYA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Spc. Crystal Sims (right), from Duncan, Okla., a project manager for the 2-45th Agribusiness Development Team, assists an Afghan with registering at the bidder’s (click for more)

Panjshir women strengthen communication skills

PANJSHIR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Ashlee Lolkus, TF Red Bulls, shows Rohubza Dousti, a trainer and supervisor at the United Nations Habitat and a Panjshir youth group (click for more)

Ghazni PRT assesses village, builds relationships

GHAZNI PROVINCE, Afghanistan - Ghazni PRT members walk among the locals engaging in conversation during a village assessment in Touheed Abad in Ghazni Province Feb. 6. (click for more)

Iowa ADT inks deal for orchard training farm

KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Haji Hazrat Ali Gull, a fruit producer, explains improvements he already made to a proposed orchard training farm site he owns to U.S. Army Master Sgt. (click for more)

Co. A makes successful return to Shebatkyl

LAGHMAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan - A team of Kiowa helicopters provide overhead security for U.S. Army Soldiers from Company A, 1st Battalion, 133rd Infantry Regiment, and Afghan National Army Soldiers from (click for more)

Delegation conducts market outreach mission in Zormat

PAKTYA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Mohammad Masood, Paktya Agricultural Department advisor, and U.S. Army Col. Robert Roshell, 2-45 Agribusiness Development Team commander from Lawton, Okla., examine spices during a mission to (click for more)

Kunar PRT medics help healing at Asadabad Hospital

KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Lynn Redman of San Antonio, Kunar Provincial Reconstruction Team nurse practitioner, examines a female Afghan patient with Afghan Dr. Ismat Shinwary, Asadabad (click for more)

http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/7467431.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/2929172.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/4078023.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/6754494.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/2518055.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/1028496.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/3726487.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/7296488.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/1886219.jpg http://cjtf101.com/components/com_gk2_photoslide/images/thumbm/87846610.jpg
http://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4143-how-one-man-makes-a-difference-in-afghanistan.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4140-guardians-of-peace-produces-results-in-paktya.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4138-working-together-to-put-afghan-heroes-back-together-again.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4136-bidders-conference-places-afghans-in-control.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4131-panjshir-women-strengthen-communication-skills.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4110-ghazni-prt-assesses-village-builds-relationships.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4109-iowa-adt-inks-deal-for-orchard-training-farm.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4102-co-a-makes-successful-return-to-shebatkyl.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4097-delegation-conducts-market-outreach-mission-in-zormat.htmlhttp://cjtf101.com/en/regional-command-east-news-mainmenu-401/4094-kunar-prt-medics-help-healing-at-asadabad-hospital.html

 

KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Spc. Joshua R. Wood, a mortar man from Pontotoc, Miss., assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, uses his entrenching tool to fill sandbags for his fighting position on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 10. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Whoop. Whoop. Whoop. The sounds of helicopters echoed through the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province the morning of Dec. 10.



Swarming, then hovering as expertly as hummingbirds, the CH-47 Chinooks and UH-60 Black Hawks dropped their cargo simultaneously on multiple ridges overlooking the Taliban stronghold only a few kilometers from the Pakistan border.

Task Force No Slack Soldiers, with heavy combat loads, saturated the valley’s walls and Operation Eagle Claw II began.

Within the first few minutes of the mission, it became real.

“There were a number of fighters we saw,” said U.S. Army Capt. Ryan A. McLaughlin, Bayonet Company commander, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack. “You could hear them on our infill when we were moving. They did attempt to react, and very quickly they were shown that that wasn’t a very good course of action.”

Several volleys of hellfire missiles exploded, killing five insurgent fighters moving into position less than a few hundred meters away. They were armed and ready for a fight.

The light from the explosions faded and darkness reigned again. As the world slept, the Taliban stalked the Bayonet Co. Soldiers who were moving into positions high in the rocky Hindu Kush Mountains to provide maximum security for the ground assault force.

“The terrain was pretty rugged,” explained McLaughlin, a Tuscaloosa, Ala., native. “We were at about 4,800 feet with elevation changes in every direction. “You go 300 meters, and you’re dropping several hundred feet. It’s pretty tricky, particularly in hours of darkness. We were looking at zero illumination with severe elevation changes.”

No matter the obstacles, the Bayonet Co. Soldiers had an essential role in the overall success of the operation.

“The over-arching concept for the mission was to disrupt what has become a safe haven for the insurgents that are in this valley,” said McLaughlin. “It’s proximity to Asad Abad, the provincial capital, was allowing the bad guys to have easy access coming through Pakistan, through this valley and into the provincial capital. Obviously that’s a problem for what we want to do … Asad Abad is the most populated area and the center of governance, so we need to protect that.”

Freezing winds whipped the rocks as the sun crawled from Pakistan over the barren mountains. Soldiers filled sandbags and built rock walls to stay warm, but more importantly, to stay safe.

“We’re (kind of) set up in a patrol base,” said U.S. Army Sgt. Joseph M. McKenzie, an infantry team leader from Chicago, also assigned to Co. B “I’m pretty sure you’ve heard, ‘You can always fix your security.’ So we keep making it better.”

McKenzie and his squad meticulously piled rock after rock giving them the best cover possible from enemy fire.

“We’re basically taking a page out of the Taliban book,” added McKenzie. “I mean, they build theirs with just rocks, but add some sandbags and it helps lock the rocks down.”

At the same time, other TF No Slack Soldiers cleared villages on the valley floor. They found eight improvised explosive devices, multiple ordnance rounds and ammunition.

“From up here, it feels pretty good to be able to give the support everybody down there needs,” said U.S. Army Pfc. Benjamin J. Lohmeyer, a rifleman from Benton, Kan., also assigned to Co. B. “If something bad happens down there, we’re able to have their backs, and that feels pretty good.”

Perched high on a rocky nest with a .50-caliber machine gun, Lohmeyer and his squad had a bird’s-eye view of the action.

“Why do I do it? I don’t know why really,” Lohmeyer said. “I do it for the people back home to make sure they’re safe and so my buddies are safe … If I weren’t here today, I’d probably have some bad job back home. I’m not going to lie; I’d be trying to get money somehow just trying to get by.

Soldiers like Lohmeyer, who aren’t just trying to get by, were critical for the overall success of a mission with so many moving parts.

“We were basically able to make a fairly impenetrable cordon around the objective,” said McLaughlin. “That allowed the ground element to come in and do their clearance more quickly than I actually projected, without having to fire a single shot.”

Though Bayonet Co. Soldiers didn’t fire a single shot; 11 insurgents were killed during the operation.

“I think it was an important operation,” said McLaughlin. “We didn’t kill hundreds of insurgents or find Osama bin Laden hiding in the Ganjgal Valley, but nonetheless a very important next step in our progression. The impacts of this one will be felt in the insurgent networks.”

McLaughlin explained, “Insurgent propaganda has recently stated specifically ‘We own the Ganjgal Valley and the coalition will never set foot here again.’ And then within a matter of weeks we showed them, ‘Hey, we can come here anytime we want and we’ll do whatever we want to extend the reach of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.”

As darkness fell on the third night, the fatigued and sullied soldiers swiftly and silently moved out from their fighting positions. They traversed the mountains back to their landing zone and the moon glimmered off their screaming eagle patches on their shoulders.

“I think when they see the 101st patch, I don’t think its fear, but it’s (an) understanding that we mean business,” added McLaughlin. “We have the tools and the desire to apply counterinsurgency principles successfully. We’re just not here to shell the mountains and not just here to kill them, but we’re actually working on a strategic victory. I think that scares insurgents more than anything else.”

The beating of the helicopters coming to pick up the soldiers signaled yet another successful mission for TF No Slack and yet another setback for the Taliban.KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Richard A. Darvial (kneeling), a combat medic from Amery, Wis., takes cover while U.S. Army Spc. Corey C. Canterbury, a mortar man from Ocean Springs, Miss., fires mortars from a mountain top overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. Both Soldiers are assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, and were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Pfc. Benjamin J. Lohmeyer, a rifleman from Benton, Kan., assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, smiles and reflects his fighting position in his sunglasses on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army 1st Lt. Andrew D. Rinehart, an infantry platoon leader from Belmont, N.C., assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, uses his scope to look for insurgent activity on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Soldiers assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, hunker down in their fighting positions on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Joseph P. Khamvongsa, an infantryman from Mililani, Hawaii, assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, uses binoculars to check out the mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Brad R. Allen, an infantry squad leader from Bristol, Tenn., assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, crouches down and uses his scope to get a better view from his fighting position on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Spc. Arturo A. Cabrera, an infantryman from Laredo, Texas, assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, searches for insurgents on a rocky mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 11. The TF No Slack Soldiers were supporting Operation Eagle Claw II. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

 KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – During Operation Eagle Claw II, artillery fire explodes on a suspected insurgent hideout as Soldiers from Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, have a bird’s-eye view on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province, Dec. 10. Eleven insurgents were killed during the two-day operation. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

Last Updated on Monday, 13 December 2010 23:01
 

    

Related Links

Bagram Airfield

The Flood

English

Dari

Thunder

Thunder

Fallen Heroes

Language Selection

Press Releases

Bastogne Soldiers help link locals, government

 

KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan –Afghanistan National Security Forces and U.S. Army soldiers of the 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, alongside other members of the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, began a series of joint operations in the Ghazibad District of the Kunar Province Feb. 16.

Read more...
 
Drug lab discovered in Nangarhar, material destroyed

NANGARHAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Soldiers assigned to Troop C, 1st Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, attached to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, conducted a search with Afghan National Security Forces in Loya Torma Village in Sherzad District Feb. 5.

Read more...
 
ANSF, TF Bastogne begin operations in Shawan Ghar Valley

NANGARHAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Afghan National Security Forces partnered with the Soldiers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, Task Force Bastogne, 101st Airborne Division, to begin operations in the Shawan Ghar Valley of the Lal Por District Feb. 3.

 

Read more...
 
Weapons cache found, destroyed in Laghman

LAGHMAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – A weapons cache consisting of more than 100 anti-personnel mines was found by coalition forces on patrol near the village of Jugi, Mehtar Lam District, Laghman Province Jan. 27. An explosive ordnance disposal team was deployed to the scene and destroyed the cache in place.

The security and safety of Afghan civilians is an important part of every coalition operation. All weapons caches found during these operations are destroyed to ensure they do not harm civilians or military personnel.

“Mines are indiscriminate killers. They don’t distinguish between Soldiers or civilians, between men, women or children. We must all work together to eliminate the threat posed by these deadly weapons,” said U.S. Army Col. Ben Corell, commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 34th Infantry Division, Task Force Red Bulls.

If you see any suspicious activity or know of a weapons cache in your area, please report it. Call the Operations Coordination Center Provincial Tip Line at 079-662-0193 or at 079-397-0975.