ANP CSI Graduates Awarded

Print
Written by U.S. Army Pfc. Roy Mercon, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs Thursday, 03 June 2010 13:17

 

BAMYAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Col. Mike Berry, commander of the Delaware Embedded Training Team, assigned to the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, renders a salute to one of the 21 graduates of the Afghan National Police’s Crime Scene Investigation program at the ANP Regional Training Center on May 28. The six-week program is one of two in Afghanistan, and is considered a vital part in the development of the country. Crime scene investigators write up and organize detailed reports on the activities being carried out at the scene and the observations made. These reports are then given to the law enforcement agency in charge of investigating the crime. Crime scene investigators may also be asked to testify in court in regards to their findings and the processing methods that were used at the scene. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Roy Mercon, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BAMYAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – A graduate of the Afghan National Police’s Crime Scene Investigation program at the ANP Regional Training Center shows his fellow policemen his certificate during a graduation ceremony at the center May 28. The six-week program is one of two in Afghanistan and is considered a vital part in the development of the country. Crime scene investigators are accountable for the initial evaluation of a crime scene and use various types of equipment to cultivate, secure and package any physical evidence found at the scene, which will later be used for scientific comparison and evaluation. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Roy Mercon, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs) BAMYAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Staff Sgt. Peter Ladensack, a member of the Delaware Embedded Training Team, assigned to the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, renders a salute to one of the 21 graduates of the Afghan National Police’s Crime Scene Investigation program at the ANP Regional Training Center on May 28. The six-week program is one of two in Afghanistan, and is considered a vital part in the development of the country. Crime scene investigators write up and organize detailed reports on the activities being carried out at the scene and the observations made. These reports are then given to the law enforcement agency in charge of investigating the crime. Crime scene investigators may also be asked to testify in court in regards to their findings and the processing methods that were used at the scene. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Roy Mercon, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)BAMYAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan – The 21 graduates from the Afghan National Police’s Crime Scene Investigation program, along with their American counterparts from the Delaware Embedded Training Team, assigned to the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Task Force Wolverine, pose for a group photo May 28. The six-week program is one of two in Afghanistan and is considered a vital part in the development of the country. Crime scene investigators are accountable for the initial evaluation of a crime scene, and use various types of equipment to cultivate, secure and package any physical evidence found at the scene, which will later be used for scientific comparison and evaluation. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Roy Mercon, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)

Last Updated on Thursday, 03 June 2010 13:31