Kentucky ADT work with Kapisa DAIL on agricultural projects

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Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter Ferrell, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs Friday, 30 July 2010 12:22

 

KAPISA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Lt. Col. Garland Goodrich, a Wakefield, Va., resident and member of the Kentucky Agribusiness Development Team, discuss the building of the roofs for two cold storage units being built into the ground behind him at the home site of the Kapisa Department of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock. The Afghan contractor building the roofs explains how a roof will cover the storage units and be insulated with 40 inches of wheat hay. The first storage unit will contain potatoes and onions, and the second will contain fruits and vegetables. Local farmers will be able to bring their harvest here and store it until needed. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter Ferrell, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAPISA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Lt. Col. Garland Goodrich, a member of the Kentucky Agribusiness Development Team, meets with Mohammad Husain, the head of the Kapisa Department of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock, to discuss the ongoing projects that the Kentucky ADT is sponsoring in the province. Goodrich is a peanut farmer from Wakefield, Va., and advises the DAIL on the best ways to grow, harvest and store crops. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter Ferrell, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAPISA PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Workers stand in a hole dug at the Kapisa Department of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock site, which will serve as a cold storage unit. The benefit of a cold storage unit is that local farmers will be able to bring their harvest here and store it until needed. Two such units are being built with guidance from the Kentucky Agribusiness Development Team. One will store potatoes and onions and the other fruits and vegetables. The next step is to build a stone wall around the inside perimeter of the hole to keep the walls from falling on the stores. Once the walls are built, a roof will be installed with 40 inches of wheat hay for insulation, which is plentiful this growing season. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter Ferrell, Task Force Wolverine Public Affairs)

Last Updated on Friday, 30 July 2010 12:30